Category Archives: Elongated Red Diploid

Elongated Red Diploid TPS Harvest

These diploid tubers are really pretty but the yield is too low for practical use.

These diploid tubers are really pretty but the yield is too low for practical use.

Advertisements

2016 TPS Varieties

Here is the list of TPS that I am growing in 2016.

  1. Red Ox (3 plants)
  2. Bountiful (1)
  3. ‘Florida Fingerling’ (2)
  4. Merlot (2)
  5. Diamond Toro (1)
  6. Magic Molly (1)
  7. Cross from ‘Mt. St. Helens’ (1)
  8. German Butterball (2)
  9. Adirondack Red (1)
  10. 2015 Elongated Red Diploid (2)
  11. Blue Shetland (1)
  12. Pig Knuckles (2)
  13. Bauer Gruen (1)
  14. Cross from ‘Redder Blood’ (4)
  15. Carola x Adirondack Blue (2)
In the beginning, four seeds of each variety  were started indoors under grow lights.

In the beginning, four seeds of each variety were started indoors under grow lights.

As the TPS seedlings grew, I selected the most vigorous starts to transplant into larger containers.

The most vigorous starts were transplanted into larger containers.

Finally, I planted the best twenty five plants outside in the garden.

Twenty five seedlings were planted outside in the garden. (8-10 inch spacing)

 

Elongated Red Diploid TPS Harvest

IMG_1420

Elongated Red Diploid tuber harvest with some berries

The TPS harvest continues…

The two ERD plants that have been growing side by side all season have finally been harvested.  The ERD #1 plant had pink flowers which produced the berries shown in the lower right hand corner of the photo.  The ERD #2 plant had white flowers and produced a couple berries which were smaller than those pictured above.  The differences between these tubers is a great example of the diversity that comes from growing potatoes from true seed.

IMG_1421

Elongated Red Diploid tuber harvest

Elongated Red Diploid TPS Comparison

This is the first ERD TPS seedling with pink flowers.

This is the first ERD TPS seedling with pink flowers.

This is the second seedling with white flowers.

This is the second seedling with white flowers.

The TPS seedlings in my garden have grown into large potato plants.  These two plants growing next to each other are from the same lot of Elongated Red Diploid TPS. Since the foliage and growth pattern of each plant has been very similar, I was surprised to see such a large difference in flower color.  The flowers that I cross pollinated by hand have formed berries.  I have seen a lot of bumblebees in my potato patch which should help with cross pollination but I choose not rely solely on their efforts.  Most of the flowers that I did not pollinate have dropped off the stem without forming a berry.  I learned to hand pollinate potato flowers from Rebsie Fairholm’s book, The Lost Art of Potato Breeding. Her book also explains the difference between diploid and tetraploid potatoes very well.  I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about growing potatoes from true seed.

 

Diploid berries on the pink flowered plant.

Diploid berries on the pink flowered plant.

The diploid berries are different from the tetraploid berries that I am used to seeing. Tetraploid berries are mostly round like cherry tomatoes while these diploids are more tubular like a miniature paste tomato.  Regardless of shape, I am happy to see that the berries on my two diploid plants are looking healthy and growing quickly.  I will wait until these two plants die down naturally to harvest both the berries and tubers.  It will be interesting to see if the different flower color of each plant corresponds with different colors in the tubers.